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Mint

Mint
– Mentha (also known as mint, from Greek míntha, Linear B mi-ta is a genus of plants in the family Lamiaceae (mint family).
– The genus has a subcosmopolitan distribution across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and North America.[6]
– Mints are aromatic, almost exclusively perennial, rarely annual, herbs

 

Fresh mint in closeup

Fresh mint in closeup

 

Mentha ( chin. : 蒪荷)
– The species is not clearly distinct, with 13 to 18 variations estimated.
– Hybridization between some of the species occur naturally. Many other hybrids, as well as numerous cultivars, are known.
– leaves have a warm, fresh, aromatic, sweet flavor with a cool aftertaste, and are used in teas, beverages, jellies, syrups, candies, and ice creams.
– In Middle Eastern cuisine, mint is used on lamb dishes, while in British cuisine and American cuisine, mint sauce and mint jelly are used, respectively.
– Mint is a necessary ingredient in Touareg tea, a popular tea in northern African and Arab countries.
– Alcoholic drinks sometimes feature mint for flavor or garnish, such as the mint julep and the mojito. Crème de menthe is a mint-flavored liqueur used in drinks such as the grasshopper.
– Mint essential oil and menthol are extensively used as flavorings in breath fresheners, drinks, antiseptic mouth rinses, toothpaste, chewing gum, desserts, and candies, such as mint (candy) and mint chocolate.
– The substances that give the mints their characteristic aromas and flavors are menthol (the main aroma of peppermint and Japanese peppermint) and pulegone (in pennyroyal and Corsican mint). The compound primarily responsible for the aroma and flavor of spearmint is L-carvone.
– Mints are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species, including buff ermine moths.

 

Benefits
– Mint oil is also used as an environmentally friendly insecticide for its ability to kill some common pests such as wasps, hornets, ants, and cockroaches.
– Known in Greek mythology as the herb of hospitality,[23] one of mint’s first known uses in Europe was as a room deodorizer.[24] The herb was strewn across floors to cover the smell of the hard-packed soil.
– Oral Care: Since it has germicidal qualities and quickly freshens breath, it adds to oral health by inhibiting harmful bacterial growth inside the mouth and by cleaning the tongue and teeth.
This is why mint used to be rubbed directly on the teeth and gums to refresh the mouth and eliminate dangerous forms of growth.
– In modern times, for the same reason, mint is one of the most common elements in toothpastes, mouthwashes, and other dental hygiene products. Of course, the easiest way to get these results is to simply chew on the leaves.
– Mint was originally used as a medicinal herb to treat stomach ache and chest pains.[18] There are several uses in traditional medicine[19] and preliminary research for possible use in treating irritable bowel syndrome.[18]
– Mint is a great appetizer or palate cleanser, and it promotes digestion. It also soothes stomachs in cases of indigestion or inflammation. When you feel sick to your stomach, drinking a cup of mint tea can give you relief
– have an anti-spasmodic effect on the soothe muscles of our body, it is a great remedy to relieve the pain of menstrual cramps.
– The aroma of the herb activates the salivary glands in our mouth as well as glands which secrete digestive enzymes, thereby facilitating digestion. These attributes are why mint is extensively used in the culinary arts.
– Much of the western world includes mint as a part of appetizers or as an element of palate cleansers, to be eaten before the main course so the food will digest comfortably.
– the strong and refreshing aroma of mint is a quick and effective remedy for nausea and related motion sickness. Mint leaves, especially freshly crushed leaves helps you deal with nausea and headache.
– In fact, many people keep menthol oil or mint-flavored products with them at all time to avoid nausea. Balms with a mint base or basic mint oil, when rubbed on the forehead and nose, gives quick relief in case of headache.
– The herb is a naturally soothing substance, so it can alleviate the inflammation and temperature rise that is often associated with headaches and migraines.
– The strong aroma of the herb is very effective in clearing up congestion of the nose, throat, bronchi and lungs, which gives relief for respiratory disorders that often result from asthma and the common cold.
– Menthol from mint essential oil (40–90%) is an ingredient of many cosmetics and some perfumes. Menthol and mint essential oil are also used in aromatherapy which may have clinical use to alleviate post-surgery nausea.[18][20]
– Asthma: Regular use of mint is very beneficial for asthma patients, as it is a good relaxant and relieves congestion.
– Breast Feeding: Studies have shown that mint oil can reduce the nipple cracks and nipple pain that so often accompany breastfeeding.
– Depression and Fatigue: Mint is a natural stimulant, and the smell alone can be enough to charge your batteries and get your brain functioning on a high level again. If you are feeling sluggish, anxious, depressed, or simply exhausted, mint and its derivative essential oils can help. It can be ingested, applied topically in a salve form, or inhaled as a vapor,
– A recent study explored the effects that mint has on alertness, retention, and cognitive function. It found that people who frequently use chewing gum, whose major active ingredient is mint, had higher levels of memory retention and mental alertness than those who did not.
– Weight Loss: Aside from all the other health benefits of mint, it also can help in your efforts to lose weight in a healthy way! Mint is a stimulant, as we’ve already mentioned, but it also stimulates the digestive enzymes that absorb nutrients from food and consume fat and turn it into usable energy. Therefore, increasing the amount of fat that is being consumed and put to use, rather than being stored and contributing to your weight gain
– Skin Care and Pimples: While mint oil is a good antiseptic and anti-pruritic material, mint juice is an excellent skin cleanser. It soothes skin, and helps to cure infections and itchiness, as well as being a good way to reduce pimples, and it can even relieve some of the symptoms of acne.
– Its anti-pruritic properties can be used for treating insect bites like those of mosquitoes, honeybees, hornets, wasps, and gnats. The cooling sensation will relieve you of the irritating sensation to scratch, and the anti-inflammatory nature of mint will bring down swelling!
In that same vein, mint oil is often a basic component of bug repellent products
– Current research shows that certain enzymes that can be found in mint may help prevent and treat cancer
– Boosts immunity: Mint leaves are packed with nutrients such as calcium, phosphorous, vitamin C, D, E and small amounts of vitamin B complex. All these compounds put together improves the body’s immune system, keeping it safe from infections and inflammation. Read

Allergic reaction
Although it is used in many consumer products, mint may cause allergic reactions in some people, inducing symptoms such as abdominal cramps, diarrhea, headaches, heartburn, tingling or numbing around the mouth, anaphylaxis or contact dermatitis.

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